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Doing what’s indicated

  
I really like this approach that Brian Clark takes on goals. Read his article here.

An excerpt:

That’s because pursuit of a planned outcome subverts smarter paths, bigger opportunities, and even clear signs of disaster. A preferable focus is on process rather than particular goals or benefits.

In my company, we call this doing what’s indicated. We always have a broad sense of direction, but we don’t create a precise step-by-step plan or dwell on specific outcomes in terms of revenue or other metrics. Instead, we start, observe, and adapt based on what actually happens.

It’s a form of improvisation, in that we’re always willing to change the route to where we’re trying to get. More importantly, we’re willing to change the destination itself.

In other words, focus on process > specific outcomes.

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